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Course 2020-2021 a.y.

20613 - POLITICAL SCIENCE - MODULE 2 (INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND POLITICS)

PPA
Department of Social and Political Sciences

Course taught in English


Go to class group/s: 24

PPA (6 credits - II sem. - OB  |  SPS/04)
Course Director:
KERIM CAN KAVAKLI

Classes: 24 (II sem.)
Instructors:
Class 24: KERIM CAN KAVAKLI


Suggested background knowledge

Background knowledge on the 3 main approaches in IR ("Realism", "Liberalism" and "Constructivism") is useful. Background knowledge on the bargaining literature (e.g. Fearon 1995 "Rationalist Explanations for War") is useful. Familiarity with basic statistical tools (e.g. OLS) is useful.


Mission & Content Summary
MISSION

This course introduces students to two literatures that have become very important for understanding politics today. 1) The first literature is on the non-military methods states use to resolve their disputes. Traditionally states have used military power to resolve their disputes, but the immense costs of war have made it less attractive. Instead, today states use a variety of non-military tools to put pressure on each other. The tools of statecraft we will discuss in this class include "economic coercion, migration, state sponsorship of rebel groups". In addition, if we have time, we will touch on cyber-coercion and the role of secrecy, as well. In each case we will cover both the theory and recent examples of how states use these tools against each other. 2) The second literature we will cover is on the relationship between new authoritarianism and foreign policy. There is a consensus that, globally, democracy is in decline and personalist regimes are on the rise. We will cover the causes of this change and discuss its implications for international politics.

CONTENT SUMMARY
  1. The first goal of this course is to improve students' understanding of how states use non-military coercive tools (e.g. sanctions) to reach their goals in the international arena. More specifically, we will discuss "economic coercion (foreign aid and economic sanctions), migration, state sponsorship of rebel groups". If we have time left, we will also touch upon "cyber-coercion" and "military coercion under secrecy".

 

2. Next we will discuss new authoritarianism and its implications for foreign policy and international relations. More specifically, we will discuss "authoritarianism, personalist regimes, populism, and polarization".  

 

The course is organized in 2 parts:

Part I:

  • Economic coercion (and subtopics)

Part II:

  • Migration as a coercive tool
  • State sponsorship of rebel groups
  • Autocracies
  • Personalist regimes
  • Populism and polarization

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Explain under what conditions conflict and cooperation are more likely in international politics.
  • Explain how states reach their goals without paying the enormous costs of military conflict.
  • Discuss the causes and consequences of new authoritarianism for international politics.
  • Assess empirical evidence on the efficacy of different coercive methods that states use.
APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Use the theoretical and empirical insights presented during the course to explain international politics.
  • Compare the pros/cons of different non-military tools of coercion that states can use in the international arena.
  • Discuss how current events will shape tomorrow's events by shaping actor preferences and perceptions.

Teaching methods
  • Face-to-face lectures
  • Online lectures
  • Guest speaker's talks (in class or in distance)
DETAILS
  • Lectures are structured according to the standard format: the instructor presents and elaborate on the material contained in the required readings, which the students will have read before class, so as to enhance in-class discussions and students’ participation.
  • Professor will make pre-recorded lectures available before synchronous lectures.
  • Some lectures are held by professors who are leading experts on the topic treated in the lecture. This allows students to learn additional insights from experts who have actively contributed to the scientific literature on a certain topic.
  • Attendance. Some of the assigned readings feature a high degree of sophistication in terms of methods of analysis. Therefore, students’ attendance is strongly recommended. In fact, although no formal prerequisites are required, the lectures provide students some necessary (yet informal) background that help them gain a better understanding of those readings that include a technical component. To qualify as an attending student and be allowed to take the partial exam, an attendance rate equal to or higher than 75% must be reported.

Assessment methods
  Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  •   x x
    ATTENDING STUDENTS
    • The student assessment is based on two main components, a partial written exam and a final written exam.
    • Each exam will make up 50% of your course grade. 
    • Each exam will be based on a mix of multiple choice and open questions. 
    • The purpose of multiple choice questions is to evaluate the student's ability to retrieve definitions and facts.
    • The purpose of open-answer questions is to evaluate the student's ability to apply their knowledge to a particular case or present a coherent argument.
    NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS
    • The student assessment is based on two main components, a partial written exam and a final written exam.
    • Each exam will make up 50% of your course grade. 
    • Each exam will be based on a mix of multiple choice and open questions. 
    • The purpose of multiple choice questions is to evaluate the student's ability to retrieve definitions and facts.
    • The purpose of open-answer questions is to evaluate the student's ability to apply their knowledge to a particular case or present a coherent argument.

    Teaching materials
    ATTENDING AND NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    The required readings for this course are scientific articles and book chapters that represent the key and/or state of the art contributions to the different topics analyzed. A complete list of the required and suggested reading is provided at the beginning of the course and is available on Bboard. Professor will make pre-recorded lectures available on Blackboard.

    Last change 07/12/2020 12:10