Insegnamento a.a. 2023-2024

20613 - POLITICAL SCIENCE - MODULE 2 (INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND POLITICS)

Department of Social and Political Sciences

Course taught in English

Class timetable
Exam timetable
Go to class group/s: 24
PPA (6 credits - II sem. - OB  |  SPS/04)
Course Director:
VALERIO VIGNOLI

Classes: 24 (II sem.)
Instructors:
Class 24: VALERIO VIGNOLI


Synchronous Blended: Lezioni erogate in modalità sincrona in aula (max 1 ora per credito online sincrona)

Suggested background knowledge

Knowledge of fundamental notions in International Relations and Comparative politics and understanding of research design and quantitative methods in political science are useful. Students that have no background in these subjects can read: Frieden, J. A., & Lake, D. A. (2015). World politics: Interests, interactions, institutions: Third international student edition. WW Norton & Company. Clark, W. R., Golder, M., & Golder, S. N. (2017). Principles of comparative politics. CQ Press. Kellstedt, P. M., & Whitten, G. D. (2018). The fundamentals of political science research. Cambridge University Press.

Mission & Content Summary

MISSION

How does what occur within states affect what occurs across states? Scholars had underestimated the impact of domestic politics on international relations for decades. The end of the Cold War, due to the collapse of Soviet Union, has highlighted the relevance of state-level factors in determining changes in the international system and states’ foreign policy. As of consequence, the study of International Relations has taken a “domestic turn”, narrowing the gap with the field of Comparative Politics and the sub-field of Foreign Policy Analysis. Taking stock of such research, this course aims to explore how factors, dynamics, and actors associated with the politics of states – such as regime type, government composition, economic cycles, elections, interest groups and bureaucracies, leaders’ psychology – impact on cooperation and conflict between states. Therefore, employing a research-oriented approach, the course contributes to broaden the understanding of international relations and how they relate to domestic politics.

CONTENT SUMMARY

The course is divided in eight parts, covering different topics. Each part is composed by two classes dealing with that topic. Beside the first part, students will be asked to set up a debate regarding an issue associated with the topic. 

 

Part I: Rationalist and structuralist explanations of the democratic peace

Part II: Democracies in war

Part III: Normative explanations of the democratic peace

Part IV: Autocracies in war

Part V: The public and diversionary war theory

Part VI: The politics of international cooperation

Part VII: The politics of international political economy

Part VIII: Foreign Policy Analysis 

 


Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING

At the end of the course student will be able to...

·      Analyze cooperation and conflict between states from a domestic politics perspective

·      Combine insights from the fields of International Relations and Comparative Politics

·      Deepen their understandings of fundamentals of political science 

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING

At the end of the course student will be able to...

·      Employ a research-oriented and problem-solving approach to questions of international politics 

·      Interpret and contextualize results from political science research for policymaking

·      Discuss and debate about issues related to international relations in an effective manner

 


Teaching methods

  • Face-to-face lectures
  • Group assignments

DETAILS

Group assignments: group debates on a topic selected by the teacher, followed by an essay expanding on each group’s presentation. 


Assessment methods

  Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  x x
  • Group assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  x x

ATTENDING STUDENTS

The written exam (that can be divided in partial exams) will cover 3/4 of the total grade (24/33 points).

The written exam will assess students' ability to:

- Analyze cooperation and conflict between states from a domestic politics perspective

- Combine insights from the fields of International Relations and Comparative Politics

- Deepen their understandings of fundamentals of political science 

 

Group presentation and essay will cover the remaining 1/4 (9/33 points). 

The group presentation and essay will assess students' ability to:

- Employ a research-oriented and problem-solving approach to questions of international politics 

- Interpret and contextualize results from political science research for policymaking

- Discuss and debate about issues related to international relations in an effective manner


NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

The written exam will cover 3/4 of the total grade (24/33 points).

The written exam will serve to assess students' ability to:

- Analyze cooperation and conflict between states from a domestic politics perspective

- Combine insights from the fields of International Relations and Comparative Politics

- Deepen their understandings of fundamentals of political science 

 

Individual student essays will cover the remaining 1/4 (9/33 points). 

The individual student essays will assess students' ability to: 

- Employ a research-oriented and problem-solving approach to questions of international politics 

- Interpret and contextualize results from political science research for policymaking

- Discuss and debate about issues related to international relations in an effective manner


Teaching materials


ATTENDING AND NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

Class materials and day-to day readings as in the syllabus 

Last change 05/12/2023 09:45