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Course 2023-2024 a.y.

20832 - DIVERSITY AND GLOBAL POLICY

TS
Department of Social and Political Sciences

Course taught in English

Go to class group/s: 31

TS (6 credits - I sem. - OBS  |  SECS-P/03)
Course Director:
GERMAIN GAUTHIER

Classes: 31 (I sem.)
Instructors:
Class 31: GERMAIN GAUTHIER


Synchronous Blended: Lezioni erogate in modalità sincrona in aula (max 1 ora per credito online sincrona)

Suggested background knowledge

A good knowledge of basic microeconomic theory (e.g. utility maximization, mathematical derivatives) and econometrics (e.g., experimental and quasi-experimental designs) is suggested.


Mission & Content Summary
MISSION

This course aims to discuss diversity, fairness, and efficiency from a global perspective. A particular emphasis is put on issues related to gender and ethnicity/race. The course addresses several fundamental questions: How should we define diversity? Why do we value it? What explains observed differences in outcomes across groups? Which policies and interventions work to promote diversity, and which don't? How does diversity relate to notions of fairness and efficiency? It provides students with the basic facts regarding unequal treatment worldwide and the analytical tools to (i) understand its origins and (ii) assess the effectiveness of corrective policies. This proves helpful when thinking of diversity within organizations (companies, NGOs, and international organizations) and society at large.

CONTENT SUMMARY
  1. We cover several dimensions of diversity and present a global panorama of unequal treatment worldwide from a geographical and historical perspective.
    • Definitions and Measurement
    • Notions of Fairness and Efficiency
    • Historical Trends and Geographical Heterogeneity
  2. We discuss why governments, companies, and organizations could value diversity.
    • Governance
    • Economic Performance
    • Sustainability, Inequality, and Well-being
  3. We study the determinants of observed differences in outcomes.

    • Socio-psychological Factors

    • Culture, Norms, and Stereotypes

    • Institutions (effects of institutional persecution, healthcare, education)

    • Discrimination (theory and empirical evidence)

    • Home Production and Family Life (theory and empirical evidence)

  4. We review different policies and their effectiveness in promoting diversity.

    • Corrective Policies  Affirmative Action

    • The Role of Public Policy – Pensions and Fiscality

    • The Role of Public Policy – Family Policies

    • The Role of Firms – Part-time and Smart Work

    • The Role of Civil Society – Social Movements

  5. We conclude with some recent issues surrounding diversity and fairness.

    • Algorithmic Bias


Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO)
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Define diversity, equity, equality, and fairness.
  • Explain trends in diversity from a global perspective.
  • Explain why diversity can benefit societies, companies, organizations, and individuals.
  • Explain why we observe differences in outcomes across groups.
  • Explain which policies and interventions help promote diversity and which don't, depending on the context.
APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
At the end of the course student will be able to...
  • Analyze empirical evidence of academic research that evaluates discrimination and the effects of corrective policies.
  • Evaluate to what extent there is discrimination against specific groups.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of policies aimed at improving diversity.

Teaching methods
  • Face-to-face lectures
  • Guest speaker's talks (in class or in distance)
DETAILS

An expert studying diversity and economics will deliver a guest lecture.


Assessment methods
  Continuous assessment Partial exams General exam
  • Written individual exam (traditional/online)
  •     x
  • Individual assignment (report, exercise, presentation, project work etc.)
  • x    
    ATTENDING AND NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    The examinations assess students' knowledge acquired during the course, that is, their ability to:

     

    • Define diversity, equity, equality, and fairness.
    • Explain why diversity can benefit societies, companies, organizations, and individuals.
    • Explain why we observe differences in outcomes across groups.
    • Explain which policies and interventions help promote diversity and which don't.

     

    They also assess whether students can successfully apply this knowledge to a given context, that is, their ability to:

     

    • Analyze empirical evidence of academic research that evaluates discrimination and the effects of corrective policies.
    • Evaluate to what extent there is discrimination against specific groups.
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of policies aimed at improving diversity.

     

    One final exam at the end of the course amounts to 100% of the grade. For both attending and not-attending students, the written individual exam is a mix of open-ended, numerical, multiple-choice, and "True" or "False" questions. The questions will concern both theory and empirics discussed in class.

     

    In addition, two multiple-choice quizzes will be administered in class via Bboard. Each one is made up of 15 questions (30Q in total). Students scoring at least 20/30 will get an extra point +1 on their final grade.


    Teaching materials
    ATTENDING AND NOT ATTENDING STUDENTS

    Profeta, Paola. Gender equality and public policies. Measuring progress in Europe, Cambridge University Press 2020.

    Last change 02/06/2023 14:26