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Course 2017-2018 a.y.

20551 - STATES, CIVIL SOCIETY AND SOCIAL WELFARE


CLMG - M - IM - MM - AFC - CLEFIN-FINANCE - CLELI - ACME - DES-ESS - EMIT - GIO
Department of Social and Political Sciences

Course taught in English


Go to class group/s: 31

CLMG (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - M (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - IM (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - MM (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - AFC (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - CLEFIN-FINANCE (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - CLELI (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - ACME (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - DES-ESS (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - EMIT (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04) - GIO (6 credits - II sem. - OP  |  SPS/04)
Course Director:
ROSS MACMILLAN

Classes: 31 (II sem.)
Instructors:
Class 31: ROSS MACMILLAN


Course Objectives

The hallmark of the modern state is its relation to civil society and the implicit agreement that states should foster the well-being of its citizens through the provision of social services, the development of regulatory regimes, and/or the provision of social and economic safety nets. This course uses the tools of social analysis to better understand the modern state and its relation to goals of social welfare, both narrow and broad.

The course is divided into three sections.

The first considers the development, diversity and change in the structure of nation states in the post World War II era, particularly in relation to the notion of the welfare state. This provides a foundation for understanding the meaning of government for citizens and how it has been structured both internally and with respect to broader trends in globalization and development.

The second considers the role of citizens and organizations in modern welfare provision. One aspect of this is the role of social movements in the development of welfare policies and practices. Another aspect is the role of organizations, often non-governmental organizations, and social networks in such activities. A key aspect of this section is the idea of evaluation and how we can understand what types of activities have been more or less successful at fostering stronger welfare environments.

The third section of the course focuses on key, large-scale intervention programs for social welfare and treats them as case studies to understand what gave rise to the initiative, what activities were undertaken, what actors were involved, and ultimately what the best evidence tells us about the success or failure of such programs. This course would have value for students interested in politics and government, sociological analysis, and economic institutions, stratification, and development.


Course Content Summary
Section 1 - Development and Structure.
  • Creating the modern state.
  • Varieties of welfare states.
  • State transformation in the contemporary era.
 Section 2 - Movements and Organizations.
  • Social movement theory and social welfare.
  • New social movements and changing ideas of welfare.
  • Organizations and social welfare.
  • Non-governmental organizations.
 Section 3 - Programs and policies for social welfare.
  • Aid for families with children.
  • Education.
  • Income support.
  • Old age pensions.
  • Health and health care.

Detailed Description of Assessment Methods
There is a standard partial/general exam format comprised of essay questions (70%). Students are also required to complete a short empirical paper (30%).
Partial exams have to be taken within the same academic year. The short empirical paper is valid until the end of the academic year.

Textbooks
None. The e-learning site includes relevant articles for each of the week’s topics.

Prerequisites
None
Last change 23/03/2017 10:40